Bio-inspired chemistry, in which biological design principles are applied to the construction of man-made hybrid nano-chemical catalytic structures, is a rapidly emerging area that is attracting intense interest.

Baruch ’60 Center for Biochemical Solar Energy Research at Rensselaer was established to meet this challenge through the combined and iterative use of chemical, biochemical, physical, nanomaterials, and advanced computational approaches for the design of highly efficient and cost-effective bio-inspired photovoltaic devices. During the annual Rensselaer Reunion & Homecoming weekend, the Baruch ’60 Center hosted a poster session and laboratory tours for the School of Science alumni “experiences” event.

Below are a few images from the event.

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[Four years ago, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai entered a relationship to promote personalized medicine and medical care through collaborations in education, research, and development of new diagnostic tools and treatments. Several innovative projects on Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, diabetes, and osteoporosis have already emerged from this partnership. As part of the relationship, the Icahn School hosted a Heath Hackathon, supported in part by the Rensselaer Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies, to explore transformative ideas in several areas of health-care delivery. The event, held October 13-15 in New York City, included Rensselaer students from all five schools, as well as students from Mount Sinai Medical Center, Columbia University, and CUNY, and hospital staff. Rensselaer students were part of all the three finalist teams who will compete for a Shark Tank-type showcase in February. In this post, the Approach spoke with Angela Su, a member of one of the finalist teams.]

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[The Jefferson Project at Lake George is conducting ongoing research into how human activities may be affecting the lake and surrounding wetlands. This guest blog by Aaron Stoler, a post-doctoral research associate in the lab of Jefferson Project Director Rick Relyea, summarizes recent research published in the journal Environmental Pollution. The Jefferson Project is a collaboration between Rensselaer, IBM Research, and The FUND for Lake George, founded to develop a new model for technologically enabled environmental monitoring and prediction to understand and protect the Lake George ecosystem and freshwater ecosystems around the world.]

What did you want to know?

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[The Jefferson Project at Lake George is conducting ongoing research into how human activities may be affecting the lake and surrounding wetlands. This guest blog by Aaron Stoler, a postdoctoral research associate in the lab of Jefferson Project Director Rick Relyea, summarizes recent research published as a featured article in the journal Freshwater Science. The Jefferson Project is a collaboration between Rensselaer, IBM Research, and The FUND for Lake George, founded to develop a new model for technologically enabled environmental monitoring and prediction to understand and protect the Lake George ecosystem and freshwater ecosystems around the world.]

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[We hope you enjoy this letter of appreciation and advice which graduating Rensselaer senior Christina Akirtava wrote to her "RPI Family."]

My father always told me “Don’t be ordinary, be extraordinary.” With these words in mind, I tried to make every day at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute count. Of course there were days I enjoyed with friends, or spent outside instead of doing work; however, all of my actions led to a well-balanced undergraduate experience that makes me the confident person I am today.

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[The Jefferson Project at Lake George is conducting ongoing research into how human activities may be affecting the lake. This guest blog by Bill Hintz, a post-doctoral research associate in the lab of Jefferson Project Director Rick Relyea, summarizes recent research published in the journal Ecological Applications. The Jefferson Project is a collaboration between Rensselaer, IBM Research, and The FUND for Lake George, founded to develop a new model for technologically enabled environmental monitoring and prediction to understand and protect the Lake George ecosystem and freshwater ecosystems around the world.]

What did you want to know?

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[The Jefferson Project at Lake George is conducting ongoing research into how human activities may be affecting the lake. This guest blog by Bill Hintz, a post-doctoral research associate in the lab of Jefferson Project Director Rick Relyea, summarizes recent research published in the journal Environmental Pollution. The Jefferson Project is a collaboration between Rensselaer, IBM Research, and The FUND for Lake George, founded to develop a new model for technologically enabled environmental monitoring and prediction to understand and protect the Lake George ecosystem and freshwater ecosystems around the world.]

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Cell Graphs

by Mary Martialay on February 2, 2017

Could the same approach that mapped the Internet be used to identify tumor cells? Bulent Yener, who has devoted more than a decade of research to the idea, recently reviewed how his work and that of other researchers contributed to biomedical research in “Cell-Graphs: Image-Driven Modeling of Structure-Function Relationships,” published in the January edition of Communications of the Association of Computing Machinery. The above video, which accompanies the article, explains how Yener and other researchers used an unorthodox analysis of the interactions between cells to determine their function.

In the video, Yener, a Rensselaer professor of computer science and director of the Data Science Research Center, explains how he transferred the techniques he applied in working on a map of the Internet produced by Bell Labs in 1999 to systems biology:

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(In this guest post, Devin Jones, a graduate student in the lab of Rensselaer biologist and Jefferson Project at Lake George Director Rick Relyea, discusses research results recently published in the journal Environmental Pollution. The research tests the effects of road salt and road salt alternatives alone and in combination with natural stressors on vernal pond communities. This research is part of the Jefferson Project – a collaboration between Rensselaer, IBM Research, and The FUND for Lake George – founded to develop a new model for technologically enabled environmental monitoring and prediction to better understand and protect the Lake George ecosystem and freshwater ecosystems around the world.)

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(In this guest post, Aaron Stoler, a postdoctoral researcher in the lab of Rensselaer biologist and Jefferson Project at Lake George Director Rick Relyea, discusses how the Relyea lab investigates the impact of stressors on stream communities. This research is part of the Jefferson Project – a collaboration between Rensselaer, IBM Research, and The FUND for Lake George – founded to develop a new model for technologically enabled environmental monitoring and prediction to better understand and protect the Lake George ecosystem and freshwater ecosystems around the world.)

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